Georgia SBEAP provides free and confidential environmental permitting and compliance assistance to Georgia businesses employing 100 individuals or less, corporate wide.

Contact SBEAP

404-362-4842

877-427-6255
http://gasmallbiz.org

 

SBEAP News
  • U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) now offers locally customized training and event email messages for small business owners. Submit email/zip code at www.sba.gov/updates.
  • New Industry Sector Specific Factsheets … Refer to “Browse by Business Sector” tab located on SBEAP website home page.
EPD News
  • EPD will discontinue free Visible Emissions Certification classes in 2017.
  • Submit your SIP application online … GEOS SIP Online Application Portal. For assistance in completing the online SIP application, please contact SBEAP at 404-362-4842.
  • To attend training classes to learn how to submit SIP applications online … GEOS Training Schedule 

General Environmental Events in Georgia

 

Plating and Polishing Industry

SIC Code: 3471 NAICS Code: 332813


Plating and polishing facilities have the potential to emit hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) that are regulated by both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (Ga EPD). The two primary rules that your operation may be subject to are briefly described below:


National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Plating and Polishing, Subpart WWWWWW, July 8, 2008 [Rule 6W]

On July 1, 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) signed into law the Plating and Polishing Area Source Rule , also known as Rule 6W. The purpose of this rule was to reduce the emissions of five specified metal HAPs from any plating or polishing operation. The specified HAPs are the following metals, including compounds containing those metals: Cadmium, nickel, manganese, chromium and lead (elemental lead is excluded).


National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Decorative and Hard Chromium Electroplating and Chromic Acid Anodizing, [Rule N], September 15, 2012

On January 25, 1995, the US EPA signed into law the Decorative and Hard Legal Manufacturing Chromium Electroplating and Chromic Acid Anodizing Chromium , also known Chromium MACT or Rule N. The purpose of this rule was to reduce the emissions of the metal HAP chrome from any operation that does plating using chromium or a compound of chromium. The rule was amended on September 15, 2012.